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Acute patellar ligament reconstruction with the synthetic LARS ligament as an internal stabilizer

Published in N°016 - March / April 2022
Article viewed 251 times

Acute patellar ligament reconstruction with the synthetic LARS ligament as an internal stabilizer

By Matteo Izzo, Pierre Ranger in category TECHNIQUE
Département de chirurgie orthopédique, Faculté de médecine de l’Université de Montréal, CIUSSS du Nord-de-l’Île-de-Montréal, Montréal, (Qc,) Canada

The acute rupture of the patellar ligament represents still an important challenge for the surgeon today. A rapid diagnosis and therapy are essential for an adequate rehabilitation of the patient since the patellar tendon is a key part of the knee extensor apparatus and is essential for walking and maintaining an upright position.

Introduction

The acute rupture of the patellar ligament represents still an important challenge for the surgeon today. A rapid diagnosis and therapy are essential for an adequate rehabilitation of the patient since the patellar tendon is a key part of the knee extensor apparatus and is essential for walking and maintaining an upright position [1]. Anatomically, the patellar ligament is the continuation of the quadriceps tendon, and mainly composed of the rectus femoris component which passes over the anterior aspect of the patella and inserts itself on the tibial tuberosity. The anteroposterior thickness of the patellar ligament is about 5 - 7 mm and less than that of the quadriceps tendon [2] . The patellar ligament has an average size of 30 mm in width and 50 mm in length [3].

Being an integral part of the knee extensor system, the role of the patellar tendon is to transmit the contraction forces of the quadriceps to the leg. Studies have shown that the distribution of forces during knee flexion are changing. When the knee flexion goes beyond 45 degrees the forces on the patellar ligament are increasing and peak at 60 degrees. Conversely, for knee flexion angles less than 45 degrees, the forces are greater in the quadriceps tendon [4]. This biomechanical concept becomes...

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