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Calcar-guided short stems in total hip arthroplasty. Why? For whom? How?

Published in N°013 - September / October 2021
Article viewed 103 times

Calcar-guided short stems in total hip arthroplasty. Why? For whom? How?

By Thomas GOETZMANN in category SURGICAL TECHNIQUE
Groupe ArticS / Clinique Louis Pasteur. 54520 Essey-lès-Nancy

Advances in total hip arthroplasty techniques (as is true for all joints) show trends towards reducing the aggressiveness of the surgery on both the soft tissue and the bone stock. The goal is to encourage the most straightforward recovery, the lowest complication rates and to anticipate any future revisions.


Advances in total hip arthroplasty techniques (as is true for all joints) show trends towards reducing the aggressiveness of the surgery on both the soft tissue and the bone stock. The goal is to encourage the most straightforward recovery, the lowest complication rates and to anticipate any future revisions.

While the results of the “operation of the century” are often dramatic, the fact remains that with the growing numbers of implants and the ever-lower average age of patients there is a risk that rates of revision will increase. Bone economy would therefore seem to be an important factor to take into account. Can we do as well, or even better, using implants that allow this bone economy? Long-term follow-up studies are still required, but the preliminary results are promising.  The SOFCOT [Société Française de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique, French society of orthopaedic and trauma surgery] symposium in 2019 confirmed this.

Short stems are now an integral part of the prosthetic arsenal, like resurfacing, which represents the extreme end of this philosophy of bone economy. There are a number of classifications, according to the height of the femoral cut or the shape and fixation type of each implant. These stems follow similar principles, but the designs may be...

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