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Cinderella shoe syndrome

Published in N°277 - October 2018
Article viewed 29 times

Cinderella shoe syndrome

By Harald Kuhn in category POINT OF VIEW
Senior Physician Specialist Orthopaedic Surgery, St.-Franziskus-Hospital Franziskusstraße 6, 49393 Lohne

What is the link between the daily practice of foot surgery and the fairy tale? Perrault described the glass slipper as properly fitting footwear: the fairy-tale template for a wearer who transforms from the poor maid Cinderella to a princess.

 

What is the link between the daily practice of foot surgery and the fairy tale? Perrault described the glass slipper as properly fitting footwear: the fairy-tale template for a wearer who transforms from the poor maid Cinderella to a princess. That moment of bliss when the shoe does not pinch. Embroidered with silk and silver, small, dainty and gold all over: that's how the Brothers Grimm described Cinderella's shoes. The Prince passed the lost left shoe to Cinderella; she "pulled her foot out of the heavy wooden clog and placed it into the slipper, which fitted like a glove". In her fairy-tale all-round shoe, the wearer was able to dance, jump into the dovecote, climb on to a tree and at first run away from the Prince. The foot injuries of her stepsisters are noticeable as abnormal in both clinical and psychological terms. The self-inflicted injuries are listed in detail: ‘...the shoe was much too small. So, the mother passed her a knife and spoke: "Cut off your toe! (the heel in the second daughter). Once you are queen, you will no longer need to walk." The girl cut off her toe (the second a piece of her heel), forced her foot into the shoe, bit her tongue so as not to give away the pain and walked out to meet the Prince. The offence: abuse of individuals in care due to...

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