By continuing your visit to this site, you accept the use of cookies for the proper management of your account and your subscriptions.

Search

Follow us on social media :
From Vision to Reality: the Clinical Experience and Future of Knee Robotic Surgery

Published in N°001 - May / June 2019
Article viewed 49 times

From Vision to Reality: the Clinical Experience and Future of Knee Robotic Surgery

By Cécile Batailler, Elvire Servien, Sébastien Lustig in category UPDATE
Orthopaedic Department, Lyon North University Hospital, Lyon - France

The rise in robotic surgery is a natural progression from computer-assisted surgery, which has been used for lower limb arthroplasties for over 20 years. The main benefit offered by robotics, whatever system is used, is accurate and reproducible bone preparation thanks to a robotic interface.

I - Introduction

The rise in robotic surgery is a natural progression from computer-assisted surgery, which has been used for lower limb arthroplasties for over 20 years. The main benefit offered by robotics, whatever system is used, is accurate and reproducible bone preparation thanks to a robotic interface.[1] The aim is not to replace the surgeon, but to improve their performance.

Many published articles[2, 3][4, 5] report on the increasing popularity of systems comprising an articulated robotic arm programmed with preoperative scan data. The drawbacks are the cumbersome equipment and the need for a preoperative scan, as well as additional staff for every operation. However, thanks to a simultaneous evolution in robotic surgery comprising a bone-morphing phase during the procedure using the Navio® system (Smith & Nephew)[4, 5], preoperative imaging studies are no longer needed.

Having used this system for the past 5 years, we wanted to report on our experience and describe how this smart tool has altered our practice.

 

II - History

The Navio® surgical system was launched in Europe in 2012 and in the USA in 2013 (Fig. 1).

Figure 1. Chronology of the Navio® surgical system (Smith & Nephew)

 

The first published cadaveric studies demonstrated the superior accuracy of this...

Content only available to subscribers

Subscribe