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Joint grafting

Published in N°007 - September / October 2020
Article viewed 21 times

Joint grafting

By in category HISTORY

Joint tissue grafts are currently one of the most widely studied topics in orthopaedic surgery, with researchers focusing both on grafts in the strictest sense, and on cell culture-based engineering.

Introduction

Joint tissue grafts are currently one of the most widely studied topics in orthopaedic surgery, with researchers focusing both on grafts in the strictest sense, and on cell culture-based engineering.

A century ago, in 1908, Henri Judet Ph.D., a Foundation Doctor working for the Paris Hospitals who had specialized in orthopaedic surgery since the turn of the century, used the following theory to justify his research in the hope of retaining joint mobility and finding a solution to the fact that most joint disease at the time ended in ankylosis.

“The perfect operation would be one which, without touching either the muscles, which are what allow us to move, or the ligaments, which are what give our joints their stability, could use super-economical resection to create a permanent gap between the two bones, a simple slit resembling the physiological joint cavity. This sort of joint renewal is virtually inconceivable other than for restoring the joint to its anatomical condition prior to the disease. Where there is complete ankylosis, a key element is missing because the ossification process has infected the joint cartilage and fused the two bones. The joint cartilage therefore needs to be replaced. With this in mind, we considered the possibility of using a graft to...

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