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Lateral unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: sticking to the indications and applying a meticulous technique in order to guarantee excellent long-term outcomes

Published in N°007 - September / October 2020
Article viewed 169 times

Lateral unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: sticking to the indications and applying a meticulous technique in order to guarantee excellent long-term outcomes

By Etienne DEROCHE(1), Roger BADET(2), Sébastien LUSTIG(1) in category TECHNOLOGY
(1) Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hôpital de la Croix-Rousse, Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University, 103 Grande rue de la Croix-Rousse, 69004, Lyon, France. - (2) St Charles Clinic, Lyon /Fleming Orthopaedic Clinic, Bourgoin Jallieu, France

Lateral unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is ten times less common than medial UKA. This is primarily due to the lower prevalence of the valgus morphotype within the general population.

 

Thanks to participants in the 2019 SOFCOT/SFHG Lateral UKA Symposium:  S. Gadeyne, FX. Gunepin, S. Lustig, S. Martres, M. Ollivier, F. Remy, F. Wein.

Introduction

Lateral unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is ten times less common than medial UKA. This is primarily due to the lower prevalence of the valgus morphotype within the general population.

There are numerous reasons for isolated lateral tibiofemoral damage: primary osteoarthritis, expedited by a valgus morphotype, often by lateral femoral condylar hypoplasia and aggravated by obesity; secondary osteoarthritis; trauma or meniscectomy; and aseptic necrosis of tibia or femur.1,2

However, once the indication for surgical replacement has been decided, many surgeons take refuge in a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) through fear of having to review the UKA a few years down the line. These fears are often based on the results of now-outdated studies, in which the survival rates were worse than for TKA and the complications more specific such as dislocation of the polyethylene component when a mobile-bearing insert had been used.3

There has been a resurgence of interest in UKA ever since functional outcomes for the medial compartment began to outp erform TKA, with low long-term revision rates and lower morbidity...

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