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Novel diagnostic approach to biofilm-related infections using Dithiotreitol (DTT)

Published in N°18 - July / August 2022
Article viewed 61 times

Novel diagnostic approach to biofilm-related infections using Dithiotreitol (DTT)

By Thami Benzakour(1), Guenter Lob(2), Hazem Alkhawashki(3), Chingiz Alizadeh(4), Lorenzo Drago(5) in category UPDATE
(1) Benzakour Thami - Zerktouni Orthopaedic Clinic - Casablanca, Morocco - e-mail: [email protected] - (2) Lob Guenter - Section Injury Prevention, DGOU, 10117, Berlin, Germany – email: [email protected] - (3) Alkhawashki Hazem - Advanced Medical Center, Riyadh 12482, Saudi Arabia. – email: [email protected] - (4) Alizadeh Chingiz - Traumatology & Orthopedics Department. Baku Health Clinic, Azerbaigian. [email protected] - (5) Drago Lorenzo - Clinical Microbiology, Department of Biomedical Sciences for Health, University of Milan, 20100 Milano, Italy / [email protected]

The implants generally used to surgically treat or manage several patients may act as a biotic surfaces in the human body, thereby facilitating the colonization and the settle of many microbial species. Microbes are often cleared by the host's innate immune mechanisms, but sometimes they can cause a devastating life threatening infection, generally called Implant-associated Infection (IAI).

Introduction

The implants generally used to surgically treat or manage several patients may act as a biotic surfaces in the human body, thereby facilitating the colonization and the settle of many microbial species. Microbes are often cleared by the host's innate immune mechanisms, but sometimes they can cause a devastating life threatening infection, generally called Implant-associated Infection (IAI). The main reason of these infections is because bacteria adhered to the implant surfaces are less susceptible to killing/elimination by the immune system (1). In addition, these bacteria may survive on the implant surfaces and develop biofilms that reduce the effect of antimicrobial agents and result in a persistent colonization which confers them an “embedded biofilm status”, then consequently difficult to be dislodged and identified.  In order to detect the true pathogens, disruption and demolition of the biofilms should indeed precede the standard microbiological methods (2).

Recently, Wildelman et al. reported that all-cause 10-year mortality is higher for patients with PJI (45%) compared with patients undergoing THA without PJI (29%). This can be due to the natural evolution of the implants, but also to the difficulty to manage these infections even microbiologically (3). ...

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