By continuing your visit to this site, you accept the use of cookies for the proper management of your account and your subscriptions.

Search

Follow us on social media :

Published in N°016 - March / April 2022
Article viewed 50 times

Open versus arthroscopic repair for chronic lateral ankle instability: a critical review and description of arthroscopic techniques

By Dexter Seow, Christopher J. Pearce in category REVIEW
National University Health System, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road Singapore 119074 / [email protected]

Ankle inversion injuries are exceedingly common, with an incidence rate of 2.15 per 1000 person-year. However, it has been reported that approximately 50% of patients that incur an ankle inversion injury seek medical attention. Ligamentous disruption most commonly involves the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and/or the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL).

Introduction

Ankle inversion injuries are exceedingly common, with an incidence rate of 2.15 per 1000 person-year [1]. However, it has been reported that approximately 50% of patients that incur an ankle inversion injury seek medical attention [2]. Ligamentous disruption most commonly involves the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and/or the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) [3]. Conservative management is the first line of treatment and is successful in approximately 80% of patients [4]. However, the remaining 20% of patients may develop chronic symptoms leading to chronic lateral ankle instability and may require surgical treatment to achieve their pre-injury level of activity.

Surgical treatment can be broadly categorised into anatomic repair, nonanatomic repair, or reconstruction. More recently, an anatomic repair can further be achieved either by an open or arthroscopic technique. Nonanatomic repair includes a variety of techniques to stabilise the ankle joint by typically involving peroneus brevis tenodesis, a technique that sacrifices part of a main dynamic stabiliser of the ankle [5]. The concerns surrounding biomechanical malalignment [6,7], hindfoot stiffness, wound complication rates [8], and subsequent development of subtalar joint osteoarthritis [9] have rightly...

Content only available to subscribers

Subscribe