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The new piriformis-preserving MIS posterior STAR approach for THA

Published in N°17 - May / June 2022
Article viewed 165 times

The new piriformis-preserving MIS posterior STAR approach for THA

By Eleftherios Tsiridis, Eustathios Kenanidis in category TECHNIQUE
(1) Academic Orthopaedic Department, Aristotle University Medical School, Papageorgiou General Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece - (2) Centre of Orthopaedic and Regenerative Medicine (CORE), Center for Interdisciplinary Research and Innovation (CIRI)-Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTH), Balkan Center, Buildings A & B, Thessaloniki, 10th km Thessaloniki-Thermi Rd, P.O. Box 8318, GR 57001, Greece - (3) ICAROS Clinic - Tsiridis Orthopaedic Institute, Thessaloniki, Greece / [email protected]

The perfect minimally invasive surgical (MIS) approach for primary Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) must be muscle-sparing, straightforward, and uncomplicated, providing fast and painless recovery and excellent cosmetic results.

Introduction

The perfect minimally invasive surgical (MIS) approach for primary Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) must be muscle-sparing, straightforward, and uncomplicated, providing fast and painless recovery and excellent cosmetic results [1]. The ideal MIS approach should deliver excellent exposure to both acetabulum and femur, guarantee accurate implantation, minimize the need for unique instrumentation, and improve the likelihood of surgeons' reproducible outcomes [1]. Several MIS techniques have been proposed for THA and their main reported advantages are improved cosmetic outcomes, better early functional results, and reduced hospital stay. On the other hand, the obstructed intraoperative visualization of the acetabulum and proximal femur during the MIS procedure increases the risk of intraoperative complications like implant malposition, periprosthetic fracture, and increased soft-tissue trauma. In addition, the limited access to the acetabulum and femur necessitates offset-reamers and special instrumentation leading to inconsistent results among surgeons or inappropriate acetabular reaming or stem positioning [1].

In 2020 Tsiridis et al. reported a case-series describing an MIS posterior muscle-sparing technique preserving the iliotibial band, offering an excellent view...

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