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The use of 3D printed models for knee revision surgery

Published in N°20 - November / December 2022
Article viewed 41 times

The use of 3D printed models for knee revision surgery

By Alessandro Bistolfi, Alessandra Cipolla, Claudio Guidotti, Monica Bonera, Luigi Sabatini, Alessandro Massè in category UPDATE
Department of Orthopaedics, Traumatology and Rehabilitation, CTO Hospital. Hospital AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza, Via Zuretti 29, 10126 Turin, Italy

Preoperative planning is a key issue in orthopaedic surgery as it requires precise and specific knowledge of each patient's anatomy, especially for complex primary cases and revision arthroplasty. Two-dimensional (2D) images often cannot provide a comprehensive understanding of severe deformities and it can be difficult to plan details in advance, especially in cases of significant bone loss due to osteolysis or bone tumour pathology.

Introduction

Preoperative planning is a key issue in orthopaedic surgery as it requires precise and specific knowledge of each patient's anatomy, especially for complex primary cases and revision arthroplasty. Two-dimensional (2D) images often cannot provide a comprehensive understanding of severe deformities and it can be difficult to plan details in advance, especially in cases of significant bone loss due to osteolysis or bone tumour pathology. Recently, orthopaedic surgeons have found that having a 3D printed model of the patient's anatomy can be useful in predicting certain steps in surgical treatment.

 

Virtual 3D models

Currently, 3D virtual reconstructions of the knee are used for computer-assisted surgery (CAS) in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), where the systems provide kinematic-geometric data of each patient for the pre-operative and intraoperative periods. Then, after the treatment time, surgeons can benefit from the information collected thanks to a communication system between the sensors positioned on the patient and the navigation system, which consists of an infrared camera coupled with transmitters [1-2]. The navigation systems are developed to achieve optimal accuracy in the positioning of prosthetic components and to increase the reproducibility of the...

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