By continuing your visit to this site, you accept the use of cookies for the proper management of your account and your subscriptions.

Search

Follow us on social media :
Update on treatment of the infected nicompartmental knee arthroplasty

Published in N°19 - September / October 2022
Article viewed 65 times

Update on treatment of the infected nicompartmental knee arthroplasty

By Angela Brivio(1), David Barrett(2) in category UPDATE
(1) Istituto Clinico Città Studi, Milano, Italy - (2) King Edward VII Hospital, London, School of Engineering Sciences, Southampton University, UK / [email protected]

Infection in UKA is substantially less than that of Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA), with an incidence varying from 0.1% to 1.0% [3]. This uncommon but severe complication is not well studied, but due to the different morphology of UKA, treatment protocols maybe different than the standard expected management of TKA infection.

INTRODUCTION

Infection in UKA is substantially less than that of Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA), with an incidence varying from 0.1% to 1.0% [3]. This uncommon but severe complication is not well studied, but due to the different morphology of UKA, treatment protocols maybe different than the standard expected management of TKA infection. In this article we will review the current knowledge how to treat infected UKA and discuss the different role of DAIR compared to infected TKA.

 

EPIDEMIOLOGY

The reasons for Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty (UKA) failure are aseptic loosening, polyethylene dislocation with mobile-bearing systems, progression of arthritis, periprosthetic fractures, wear, bone implant impingement, retaining of cement debris, ankylosis of the knee, recurrent hematoma, persistent pain and infection [1-4]. Focusing on infection as a complication, UKA infection incidence varies from 0.1% to 1.0%.

Kim et al reported a total of 1,576 UKAs performed between January 2002 and December 2014. Out of 89 complications (5.6%), he recorded 5 cases of infection (0,3%) [1]. Hernandez et al retrospectively reviewed 22 years of Mayo Clinic data and noted only 15 UKA infections out of a total of 1440 UKAs (1.0%) [5]. Bergeson et al. published on 1000 consecutive medial UKAs, in...

Content only available to subscribers

Subscribe